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The Spitfire Site

A Tribute to Britains Finest Fighter

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Author Topic: Seven  (Read 9291 times)
jenshb
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« on: May 23, 2009, 12:31:39 AM »

Not just a frighteningly good film, but also one of the more elegant variants of the Spitfire.  Built for high altitude combat, the aircraft was fitted with a pressurised cabin and extended wingtips to climb higher and have better manoeuvreability in the thin air.  The pointed rudder fitted the extended wings aesthetically, and the retractable tail wheel tidied up the rear end.  There were fuel tanks in the wing leading edges just inboard of the cannons increased endurance to enable the aircraft to reach and fight at high altitudes.  The simple colour scheme or Medium Sea Grey and PRU Blue enhance the lines, and intention is to finish the model to something like this.  The original extended wingtips were replaced with elliptical ones as shown in the picture after the 17th June as they couldn't get high altitude "trade" - in fact the aircraft were mainly used for bomber escorts and even had the occasional opportunity to strafe ground targets.  Not quite the missions the designers had in mind for the Mk VII... 



Thanks to Edgar Brooks, and from people at trashmodeller.com, I've been able to piece together what I think is a representative cockpit of the Mk. VII.  To keep the cockpit sealed, there was no door on the pressurised versions.  The lack of a separate cockpit door is one of the benefits of the Hasegawa kit - it just takes a little scraping to remove details and serve as a blank canvas for detailing.   Eduard photoetch for the ICM kit will also be used on this one.



The starboard cockpit side has also some details added - the two main things are the small door on the upper forward side that could dump the cockpit pressure and a beam behind the seat frame that is also there on the PR.XIX and variants with the Lobelle hood.  Due to the limited views of the cockpit, there was no point replacing the seat brackets with photoetch.





The non-pressurised variants were completely open into the rear fuselage, but the pressurised ones had a bulkhead behind the rear glazing that the wires for the shoulderstraps and controls fed through.  The small "thing" sticking out is where the cable that releases the shoulder straps goes.



The instrument panel will be replaced with photoetch.  The main addition here is a bracket and a barometric altimeter.  This read the pressure (i.el "altitude") in the cockpit, and if the cockpit was "climbing", there was a leak.



Here the panels that cover the wing tanks have been scribed.  These were separate panels, so the holes for riveting the wings had to be filled.  There should be a panel line at the leading edge too - this will not be due to poor filling:)  Thin pieces of plasticard have been glued to the roof of the radiator intakes to fill small gaps.



Jens
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jenshb
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« Reply #1 on: May 24, 2009, 02:39:39 PM »

The final details added before paint.  There is supposed to be a clear silica gel cartridge behind the headrest, but I'll add this once the fuselage halves have been joined and the cockpit painted.







It's not often you get the chance to correct an Ultracast part, but it's not their fault that the Hasegawa kit is too short in the nose...  The Mk. VII had the early intake, which is not included in the kit, but this is faithfully represented in resin.  The only improvement needed is to hollow out the intake.



Jens
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jenshb
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« Reply #2 on: May 25, 2009, 01:02:26 PM »

Here are the latest pics - got to run, but I trust they are self explanatory.

Basis for shadows...





Base colours on...







After washing and drybrushing.  No mattcoat, just a single brushed coat of Polly S clear gloss.







Jens

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Editor
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« Reply #3 on: May 25, 2009, 01:41:49 PM »

Looking very good so far, and a commendable level of detail inside the cockpit! Pls keep us posted.
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marluc
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« Reply #4 on: May 26, 2009, 08:44:07 PM »

Hello Jens:

You´ve done a very fine job in the cockpit interior,congratulations.Good start for a very interesting Spitfire,keep on with the good work.Greetings:

Martin
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jenshb
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« Reply #5 on: June 08, 2009, 10:43:21 AM »

Thanks for that Marluc.

Some phases seem to make little progress even though a little is done each day...

The Hasegawa kit must be modified a little to take the extended wingtips from the ICM kit.  Cut off the outer part of the ailerons marked with an engraved panel line - as shown to the right...



...and the ICM wing tips need a little modification - the original part to the left.



And the result only requires a little filler.



The tailwheel well in the Hasegawa kit is very simplified.  First stage is to glue the rear part  to the rudder and then cut off.



Then I punched the shape of the holes in 0.25 mm plasticard.



Glued the roof in the tail wheel bay to the fuselage...



And then filled hte tail wheel cavity with Milliput and pressed an old wheel in the still soft Milliput.  Sorry, forgot to take a pipc:)

The tail wheel doors in the kit are too thick and sparsely detailed.  First thinning and then adding detail with plasticard and strip.



To make the elevators in the nose down position, I decided to modify the kit parts rather than spend money on resin.  Cut loose the kit elevators and glued a strip of plastic to the leading edge.  The stab was hollowed out in the rear.



Luckily, the sanding and filling phase is drawing to an end and paint soon.  BTW, I'm assuming the radiator interiors, tail wheel well, main wheel well, main wheel door interiors and gear legs would be PRU Blue (the wheel hubs would be silver) - correct?

Jens
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DominikS
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« Reply #6 on: June 08, 2009, 10:41:18 PM »

Hi Jens.

There is resin conversion set for Hasegawa/Revell Spitfire which allows to build Spitfire Mk.VII. It includes wingtips and early type air intake. It's made by Quickboost. I've bought one as in the future I'll built "Seven" myself.
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Edgar Brooks
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« Reply #7 on: June 09, 2009, 11:52:35 AM »

BTW, I'm assuming the radiator interiors, tail wheel well, main wheel well, main wheel door interiors and gear legs would be PRU Blue (the wheel hubs would be silver) - correct?
From what I've found, over the years, it's very unlikely; on factory-built airframes, I've tended to find wheel wells in green primer (right up to the 22,) silver radiator housing interiors, u/c doors, and legs, though if airframes and doors were painted in MUs, or on Squadron, then wheel wells, and door interiors could have got a coating of whatever was being used on the u/s, since it was easier, and quicker, than trying to mask things off.
  U/c legs, although initially silver, could have been almost any colour, since, when (regularly) serviced, they were cleaned, in paraffin, to remove any oil/grease residue.  This would have played havoc with the paint, so, on reassembly, the fitter would have had to repaint them, with whatever he had available.  Wheel hubs should have been silver, since they wouldn't want to risk paint flakes going onto the brake surfaces.
Edgar
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jenshb
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« Reply #8 on: June 09, 2009, 01:18:23 PM »

Thanks for your insight Edgar - the radiator housings are glued on now, so they will just have to remain PRU Blue...  So if the wheelwells were painted in primer, then I assume that any overspray would be present when repainting the gear legs and inside wheel covers?  Or would they mask the wheelwells to keep overspray out?

Jens
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Edgar Brooks
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« Reply #9 on: June 09, 2009, 02:22:36 PM »

From what I've seen, the wells are only likely to have received a full coat, if the a/c was on its u/c, in a M.U., for example.  Lying on your back, cramped for space (maybe pushed for time,) isn't particularly conducive to fretting about the niceties of keeping paint out of the wells.  The wells don't appear to have been bothered with, but I would expect some effort to have been made in the areas where the legs went.  Paint on the working "bits" could have been a flaming nuisance, I reckon.  I don't know what the normal procedure would have been, but I think that every effort would have been made to keep paint off the wheels (cellulose and rubber don't mix) so just the outside of the doors would have been treated, with cloth draped over the tyres.  U/c legs should also have been kept covered, to keep paint off the oleos.
Edgar
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jenshb
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« Reply #10 on: November 04, 2009, 11:34:12 PM »

It's been a while since I posted anything on this one, but at long last can I call this finished - just in time for the local club meeting tomorrow and Scale Model World in the weekend.  The subject is MD111, NX-Q from 131 Sqn based at Culmhead in the days just after the D-Day.  According to Spitfire - the history, MD111 was delivered from Eastleigh to 9th Maintenance Unit on the 22nd December 1943.  The aircraft was accepted by 131 Sqn on the 7th February 1944, and received Category AC damages following operations on the 18th June.  The 23rd of November 1944, the aircraft was transferred to 154 Sqn, and struck off charge following trials on the 7th December 1948.









Thanks to all - and especially Edgar Brooks - who have provided info to make this model more accuracte though there are still faults.  Read all about it in a future issue of a wellknown UK modelling magazine:)

Jens
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GregW
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« Reply #11 on: March 04, 2010, 12:33:25 AM »

Just wanted to say what a stunning model this is. Well done, she's a beaut.
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al49
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« Reply #12 on: March 07, 2010, 12:43:21 AM »

Very nice model, well done!
Alberto
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marluc
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« Reply #13 on: March 09, 2010, 10:06:51 PM »

Superb work Jens,it´s a beautiful Spitfire and the extended wingtips make it an interesting model.Excellent paintwork,greetings.

Martin
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