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Author Topic: The Mk Ib  (Read 4021 times)
Valinsky123
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« on: May 27, 2009, 10:36:25 AM »

Hello, this is my first time on the Spitfire forum but I thought I should go straight to the experts!  I'm trying to model one of the first Mk1b's that served with 19 Squadron in August 1940, armed with just the two Hispano cannon.  Can anyone tell me whether the wings on these aircraft were converted, or whether they were new?  The reason is that I've put a Mk Vb wing on (changed the ailerons and oil cooler intake of course!) which has the two outer machine guns with their covers etc.  Really, it boils down to whether I fill in these covers (new wings) or scribe on the cover for the machine gun bay second out from the fuselage on the original A type wing (converted wings).  The Vb wing would be fine for the late Ib's deliverd to 19 and 92 squadron that had these two machine guns on each wing, but not for the original Ib's.

I do hope that makes some sense, it's rather difficult to describe!
Thanks in advance for all advice,
David
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Edgar Brooks
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« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2009, 11:52:47 AM »

There's a file, on just this subject, in the National Archive, and one letter states that Supermarine would convert standard wings, with the outer panels still in place, but with the muzzles and empty case chutes sealed (doesn't say how, but, later on, a double thickness of the fabric patches became the standard method.)
Edgar
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Editor
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« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2009, 12:08:41 AM »

There's a file, on just this subject, in the National Archive, and one letter states that Supermarine would convert standard wings, with the outer panels still in place, but with the muzzles and empty case chutes sealed (doesn't say how, but, later on, a double thickness of the fabric patches became the standard method.)
Edgar
Do I understand correctly that you mean that fabric patches were also used to seal the spent case chutes?
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gingerbob
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« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2009, 09:46:56 PM »

Bear in mind that the outer 4 mg's later went back in to these aircraft, so I think Edgar's right that a fabric patch is most likely, rather than having to re-cut holes that had been omitted during construction.

bob
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Edgar Brooks
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« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2009, 11:48:44 PM »

Do I understand correctly that you mean that fabric patches were also used to seal the spent case chutes?
Whether they were, or not, I've been unable to find out (in Spitfire at War one armourer says that he used pieces of newspaper,) but the Mod, no.259, read "To delete covers for gun tunnels and empty case chutes and to substitute fabric patches in lieu."  I don't know enough, about the physics of the subject, to say whether the empty cases could have been capable of breaking through the fabric.
Edgar
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