?

The Spitfire Site

A Tribute to Britains Finest Fighter

» Forums Home  |  » The Spitfire Site

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
 
Pages: [1] 2
  Print  
Author Topic: AZmodel Spitfire Mk.1 "Early"  (Read 24706 times)
magnusf
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 67



Email
« on: November 12, 2009, 03:54:21 PM »

I picked up the new AZmodel Spitfire at Telford and here are some initial impressions!

 
Nice box art!

 
Three different marking options, all pre-war from No. 19 squadron with flat canopies and Watts two-blade props. This was the main reason for me to pick this boxing, I like the fact that the very early Spitfires look so odd with their huge props!

 
Decal sheet - no idea how they perform yet but the printing is top notch!

 
Two sprues of grey plastic in the box, this is one of them...

 
...and this is the other one of course Smiley ! Note the inclusion of Watts, DH and Rotol props.

 
There is only one canopy included, a flat one with unarmoured windscreen. And this is where the trouble starts: the windscreen is too short resulting in a too steep angle from the fuselage and the flat panel being too short. It simply looks squashed  Sad.

 
Two photos of the Spit I at Cosford taken last Friday (not that the date matters really...)

 

Scribing is delicate, shape looks good compared to photos and drawings and then they mess up the one thing that is really hard to fix! I am ANNOYED!

After a good night's sleep I decided to order a set of Spitfire canopies from Falcon just in case. And as a revenge against the plastic I will use the original kit part for painful experiments, hopefully this exorcism will result in a new canopy!

 
Preparing for painful plastic experiment...

 
...and then I haven't started to use the file yet! Ain't I evil! Cheesy

Regards

Evil Magnus, the Plastic Torturer
« Last Edit: February 26, 2011, 02:29:59 PM by magnusf » Logged
magnusf
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 67



Email
« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2009, 10:01:05 PM »

A bit more work on the interior. The bulkhead that can be seen through the rear part of the perspex is missing.

 
Two oversize pieces of plastic are fitted inside the fuselage halves. Securely glued since they will have to withstand a bit of carving later!

 
After shaping the inside with scalpel and file and drilling a few holes.

 
The centre will have to be filled and sanded after the fuselage halves are mated.

Regards

Magnus
« Last Edit: February 26, 2011, 02:29:49 PM by magnusf » Logged
magnusf
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 67



Email
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2009, 11:40:24 PM »

Painful plastic experiment continues...

More of an illustrated guide to how I do canopies than Spitfire modelling tonight!

 
Original canopy, filled with Milliput for stability and with material added for re-shaping.

 
Very little of the extra material left... Windscreen now leans much more backwards.

 
I make a mould out of silicone clay. It is impossible to use the old canopy/plug to make new canopies since the plastic cracks due to the heat. The different materials (plastic and Milliput or Tamiya putty) will also leave marks in the finished canopy no matter how much time one spends on sanding and polishing!

 
A new resin plug is cast in the mould.

 
The finished plug! A bit of polishing then it is vacuum time!

 
Two prototype canopies (more polishing needed...), the plug and my home-made vacuum tool. This attaches to the vacuum cleaner and a toaster is used to heat the plastic!

Regards

Magnus
« Last Edit: February 26, 2011, 02:29:38 PM by magnusf » Logged
magnusf
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 67



Email
« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2009, 09:50:16 AM »

Quite nice as it comes in the box!

 
Interior parts prior to painting. I did a new seat from plasticard and drilled out a few of the holes in the bulkheads, otherwise all is straight from the box.
Funnily there is no mention of the control stick in the instructions. I suppose that most of you know where it goes anyway!

 
Fuselage half with landing gear pump handle and selector added. I haven't checked the rest of the details but thought it felt good to add this typical feature of early Spitfires!

Regards

Magnus
« Last Edit: February 26, 2011, 02:29:27 PM by magnusf » Logged
magnusf
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 67



Email
« Reply #4 on: November 19, 2009, 10:28:35 AM »

 
Interior parts after painting. Seat belts came from a Hurricane etch sheet while the rest if from the kit. Note that gun sight was cut away at an earlier stage since this aircraft had a ring-and-bead sight.

On the subject of interior colours, I read this article by Brett Green that includes a discussion on the subject of early Spitfire cockpit colours. This should have been a colour looking like "Eau-de-Nil", literally "Water from the Nile".

 
A quick google turns up lots of pictures of Eau-de-Nil, I did a colour chip from a selection of what I found. Regarding "Water from the Nile": bring your swimwear if you dare to jump into water this colour Cheesy

My cockpit paint is a mix of Lifecolor UA116 and UA060 in proportions 2:1.

 :-H

Magnus
« Last Edit: February 26, 2011, 02:29:19 PM by magnusf » Logged
Editor
Administrator
Full Member
*****
Posts: 166



WWW
« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2009, 03:17:56 PM »

Interesting analysis. That brings up the question if Eau de Nile wasn't simply a pre-offical name for Interior Green....

Great build BTW. Keep us posted.
Logged
NZTyphoon
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 68


« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2009, 11:22:43 PM »

Not only was Eua-de-Nil used for the early Spitfire cockpits, it was also used underneath many RAF aircraft (often described as "Sky"), starting in June 1940, until the true Sky 'Type S' - seemingly lighter in shade and hue - became available in 1941...
Michael J F Bowyer in his old, but still infomative, "Fighting Colours" (Patrick Stephens 1975) wrote " For the most part this Sky tint meant to be blue was more accurately a pale shade of green...fairly accurately called duck egg green....by the end of August it was the most common shade. In later years this officially designated Sky Type 'S' ('S' denoting smooth to differentiate from ealier rough Titanine Camoutint), was a much lighter tone than that of 1940."
Unlike many current authors Bowyer had benefitted from direct observation of the colour changes and usually noted them down at the time.
Logged
Editor
Administrator
Full Member
*****
Posts: 166



WWW
« Reply #7 on: November 21, 2009, 12:18:44 AM »

Not only was Eua-de-Nil used for the early Spitfire cockpits, it was also used underneath many RAF aircraft (often described as "Sky"), starting in June 1940, until the true Sky 'Type S' - seemingly lighter in shade and hue - became available in 1941...
Michael J F Bowyer in his old, but still infomative, "Fighting Colours" (Patrick Stephens 1975) wrote " For the most part this Sky tint meant to be blue was more accurately a pale shade of green...fairly accurately called duck egg green....by the end of August it was the most common shade. In later years this officially designated Sky Type 'S' ('S' denoting smooth to differentiate from ealier rough Titanine Camoutint), was a much lighter tone than that of 1940."
Unlike many current authors Bowyer had benefitted from direct observation of the colour changes and usually noted them down at the time.

I'm only learning new exciting things here today Smiley Sydney Cotton's early PR Spitfires in France reportedly carried a pale green shade called "Camotint". Hmm. Could even this be some variation of  Titanine Camoutint = Eau de Nile = Sky = Duck Egg Green ?
Logged
Edgar Brooks
Full Member
***
Posts: 183


Email
« Reply #8 on: November 21, 2009, 05:17:40 PM »

Spitfire cockpits were not Eau-de-Nil, they were their own shade of green (possibly originating in the 1930s) which can be seen in the cockpit of the S6B, and it's entirely possible that they used it, fleetingly, for the undersides of aircraft during the latter half of 1940.  When Messrs Cross and Scarborough inspected R6915, for their book on the Airfix 1/24 Mk.I, at Lambeth, which, fortuitously, had been taken down for cleaning, they reported a "sickly shade of green"(hardly Eau-de-Nil) and gave a (sort-of) mix for it, using Airfix's colours of the time.
 This year, I was able to inspect some left-over panels, from AR213, after her first ever rebuild, and, after cleaning away years-worth of grime and dust, found a green which was an exact match for 90 Beige-Green, in the Humbrol range.  We also found a metal seat, from another Spitfire, but dating from Mk.I days, which was also the same colour.  Apparently, more recent issues of the 1/24 Mk.I did advocate using 90 inside the fuselage.  Unfortunately, we've now discovered that Hornby/Humbrol had no idea what 90 was supposed to be, but assumed that it was supposed to be Sky, and have now changed the formula to match it.
There's a report, somewhere, that Sky was not the same as Camotint, possibly because its inventor, Sidney Cotton, had registered the colour, and name, with Titanine.
  The Ministry never referred to a duck-egg green; in A.M.O.s the title was, always "duck-egg blue (Sky Type "S")".  I have a theory that the duck-egg part was never meant to refer to the colour (how many green, or blue, duck's eggs have you seen?) and suspect that it was the finish; look at a duck's egg, and it has a smooth, satin, surface.
Edgar
« Last Edit: November 21, 2009, 11:18:40 PM by Edgar Brooks » Logged
magnusf
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 67



Email
« Reply #9 on: November 24, 2009, 12:50:36 PM »

Wings and fuselage mated together!

 
Wings won't fit together properly without thinning the lower wing and removing plastic from the mating surfaces of the upper wing.

 
Wing roots are always troublesome on Spitfire kits! I will fill with plastic card.

 
Rear part of the wing had to be forced up against the fuselage but the end result was OK. Filling with CA and careful sanding will probably yield a good result!

Edgar! I haven't gotten around to repaint the belts but it WILL be done before canopy is on!

Regards

Magnus
« Last Edit: February 26, 2011, 02:28:54 PM by magnusf » Logged
Editor
Administrator
Full Member
*****
Posts: 166



WWW
« Reply #10 on: November 24, 2009, 09:16:37 PM »

"Troublesome" is the name of this fit Smiley
Logged
Damiaes
Newbie
*
Posts: 28


Email
« Reply #11 on: November 25, 2009, 11:04:39 PM »

HI Smiley
what I find, is that the price is lifted up for the model that is!!!!!!
Logged
magnusf
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 67



Email
« Reply #12 on: November 27, 2009, 12:24:51 AM »

 

 
Shims of thin plastic filling the gaps. One has to be careful when doing this so the wing dihedral doesn't change and also so that the plastic really bridges the gap and sticks well to both edges. If not, it will probably go "crack" at the least convenient moment (after painting but before decals is a favourite!).

 
After a bit of sanding and some more putty to fix a few last blemishes! Stabilisers have also been added, without any locating tabs Sad . I did my own by drilling through the fin and inserting thin steel wire, this helps to keep it square while the glue is drying!

Regards

Magnus
« Last Edit: February 26, 2011, 02:28:43 PM by magnusf » Logged
marluc
Newbie
*
Posts: 40


« Reply #13 on: November 28, 2009, 11:08:54 PM »

Hello Magnus:

Good work so far.I like the cockpit interior and the excellent job you´ve done moulding a new canopy.I think that the gap filling turned out very well.
It´s one of the most interesting variants of the Spitfire,thanks for sharing the progress.Greetings.

Martin
Logged
magnusf
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 67



Email
« Reply #14 on: December 07, 2009, 03:43:29 PM »

Martin! Thanks for the comments, I'm glad you like it!

Final work before painting finished! There is one outlet below each wing tip, probably for ejecting gun heating air. I have no explanation why they are not of the same size though!
 

 

 

 

 
I'll just need to finish that canopy (and repaint the belts Smiley ), then it is painting time!

Regards

Magnus
« Last Edit: February 26, 2011, 02:28:32 PM by magnusf » Logged
Pages: [1] 2
  Print  
 
Jump to:  



Login with username, password and session length