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Author Topic: Spitfire Mk XIVe Code letters AE-S serial no RM906?  (Read 6998 times)
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« on: August 18, 2009, 01:34:09 PM »

Spitfire Mk XIVe Code letters AE-S serial no RM906

I have recieved a question from a reader regarding the fate of this aircraft. Its remains were allegedly recovered by the Dutch museum (?).

The ops record is as follows:

29-10-44 33MU 
4-1-45 402Sqn 
25-2-45 Hit by flak on sweep and abandoned near Enschede 
22-9-47 cancel to BAF as SG-19 
16-1-48 crashed
 
There is also a small mention of RM906 in the book Griffon Spitfire Aces by Andrew Thomas, Chris Davey, stating that on 24 February, a day before the crash, it was flown by Sqn/Ldr Moore on the first mission of his tour, a fighter-bomber mission over Emmerich-Wesel.

The event on 25 February occured on another mission North West of Heiden, hit by flak on a strafing mission. Pilot bailed out, a/c crashed.
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Edgar Brooks
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« Reply #1 on: August 18, 2009, 08:01:12 PM »

According to "Spitfire International" SG-19 was RN206.
Edgar
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« Reply #2 on: August 18, 2009, 08:49:10 PM »

According to "Spitfire International" SG-19 was RN206.
Edgar

This is perhaps right. RN206 becoming RM906 could be result of some typo.

My correspondent means that RM906 crashed to the ground on 25 Feb 1945 and so should obviously be beyond repair. Bits and pieces of it were located and uncovered post-war.

Anyone?
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Antoni
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« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2009, 04:39:51 PM »

According to "Spitfire International" SG-19 was RN206.
Edgar

This is perhaps right. RN206 becoming RM906 could be result of some typo.

My correspondent means that RM906 crashed to the ground on 25 Feb 1945 and so should obviously be beyond repair. Bits and pieces of it were located and uncovered post-war.

Anyone?

Not necessarily, the history quoted for RM906 is found in Morgan & Shacklady. It also has RN206 going to the BAF as H-96. As BAF Spitfires all have SG serials that must also be nonsense. RM906 is not listed as a BAF Spitfire in Spitfire International. You need a copy of the Aircraft Movement Card from Hendon to find out its real history.
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alvin5182
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« Reply #4 on: November 16, 2009, 11:10:07 PM »

Gents:

In the old Proflile Publications  (#246) SG 19 is called out as ex RM906 of 402 Sqn. . Lists its service with 2 Wing and then 3eme Esc before being passed onto another unit, possibly the Ecole de Chasse! There is a colour profile of it coded as YL*M still in it's camouflaged finish as well. Not definitive at best!

Alvin5182
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John Melson
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« Reply #5 on: December 12, 2009, 02:00:41 AM »

The fate of RM906 AE*S as described by F/L Bill Harvey:

Our Section of four Spits took off into the bright blue sky each armed with the usual two 20 mil cannon and two .5's augmented, on this particular trip, by a 500lb. bomb. Our primary task was to disrupt rail traffic by dive bombing and cutting (blowing up) a railroad track with the bombs. We flew into the area around Wesel in Germany at about 10,000 feet and noticed two Me262 jets below us. Les Moore was leading, I was flying #3 and a new boy, Peterson, was my wingman. Les suggested we jettison the bombs and have a go at the 262's. We dropped the bombs but the Jerry pilots saw us coming, poured on the coal and zipped out of sight in their much faster jets. Oh well! It was worth a try! Without bombs we were back to searching for ground targets with our .5's and 20 mils. Shortly thereafter Les spotted a train barreling along on the line from Munster to Borken. It was about 8:30 a.m. and the train seemed to be trying to make the cover and protection of the trees and ack-ack guns surrounding the town. Having a go at the train before it got too close to the ack-ack guns seemed expedient so Les leafed over with his #2 and dropped down to the deck while Peterson and I stayed above to give cover - i.e. make sure no Jerry 190's were having a go at them while they were having a go at the train. They had a good attack with lots of hits on the train, pulled up, exchanged places with Peterson and me and we went down to have our 'turn'. I checked back over my shoulder at 1000 feet or so and Peterson was right with me on my starboard side so we steamed on in and attacked the train at right angles. I took the engine and told Peterson to concentrate his fire on two or three cars behind it. At over 300 m.p.h. your actual shooting time is only a few seconds before you have to pull up to avoid flying into something. I had a good "go" with lots of cannon strikes on the engine. I completed my attack, eased back on the stick to pull and over the engine and just starting to feel good about the whole exercise when things started to go amiss. I got hit with an 88 through the left wing. Fortunately it didn't explode. It went right through but I also got clobbered in the engine by some light flak, 30 mil stuff. I gained altitude to about 7000 ft but the engine began making strange labouring noises, the r.p.m. dropped off and the prop stopped. Shortly thereafter flames started pushing through the firewall so it was time to part company with the Spitfire. I stayed with it down to about 2500 feet and bailed out. Perhaps you can accept that at moments like this there is not a great deal of time for careful analytical pondering, and planning the best manner in which to address problems. You act quickly and instinctively - which is not necessarily to say cleverly and astutely. For some reason or another - I have no idea why - I decided to get out the right hand side of the aircraft rather than the left where the little half door is. This raises your exit point and increases your chances of hitting the tail plane. Sure enough I hit the tail and in so doing lost my watch, which my folks had given me when I joined the Air Force. The 'chute opened. The float down was uneventful. Nobody shot me. I saw my aircraft hit the ground and explode about a mile away..............

As a side note, both S/L Les Moore and F/O G. Peterson were later shot down and killed by flak while attacking trains - S/L Moore flying MV258 25 Mar 45 and F/O Peterson flying the replacement AE*S - RM904 on 11 Apr 45.

Long story short RM906 did not become SG-19.

Cheers,
John

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« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2010, 11:55:38 PM »

I'm forwarding further commentary from Joop Thuring:

"This Spitfire took off from B.88 HEESCH, February 25, 1945 at 08.35 hour with F/Lt W.D. "Bill" Harvey, J12062 at the helm (see the relevant ORB, a copy is under my control). His Spit crashed east of the town of Borken and Bill bailed out himself safely, a little bit to the north-east, all in Nazi-Germany and indeed not so far from the Dutch-German border.

The aircraft crashed in bits and pieces. Its engine was recovered by Dutch Air War Researchers - AVOG -, in 1981.

Once, the Griffon, the mechanic heart of RM 906 did return to B.88 (on loan for a fortnight) and was the centre piece of an exhibition in 1991, paying tribute to those who from B.88 contributed to the resettlement of democratic freedom in this part of Europe and in Heesch/Nistelrode area in particular.

Several veteran pilots from 126 RCAF Spitfire Wing and once operating from B.88 attended the official opening of this exhibition. Bill himself did send from Canada a telegram to the audience to express his sincere attitude to keep in this way their efforts alive."
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Johne
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« Reply #7 on: February 05, 2010, 02:26:38 PM »

SG19 wa RN206.

/John E
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